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#316 bootrocket

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 11:36 PM

Yes, thanks phaser, got the part about the 2013 post, and thanks Ixian, I've read about leaving 10% of an SSD free, but I appreciate the reminder.  I appreciate the continuing interest in separate drives as well -- for individualized security settings and permissions, I now see.  How might I set them by the way?  What happens when we do not create a firewall around them?  I'm a quick study, but I'm new to this stuff.

 

Also, so as not to leave your generous advice in the dark, my new system, so far, looks like it will consist of the following:

 

CPU: Intel i7 Quad Core 4790K, 88W / 4.0 GHz (before overclocking)

GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 4GB

RAM: 16 GB (2 x 8) Kingston DDR3 - 1600

MB: Asus Sabertooth Z97 Mark 2

SSD (main): 1 TB Samsung 840 EVO 2.5 inch (SATA III)

Power: Seasonic x 850W 

Cooling: Gelid Tranquillo fans

 

... and I'm open to suggestions.  Been workin' a lot of extra time to get this bad boy.  The emphasis will be on quiet -- not the fastest, but certainly not the slowest.

 

br


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#317 TechAngel85

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 12:05 AM

Also, it is always a good idea to store the OS and most non-game-related software on the C:\ drive either on a different physical drive or partition than game-related software to simplify setting security/permissions apart from the OS.

 

I would also recommend 100 GB for the OS partition to allow for other software, and SSDs all around ... but a large HDD is always good for storage.

 

I personally use a 110 GB SSD for my OS and general software (I use a bout 55 GB of that) and another 110 GB SSD for Skyrim and related software/mods. Then I have about 1 TB of HDD space for mod packages, media and other files. And remember that about 10% of any SSD should remain unallocated for over provisioning (optimization and life extension of the SSD).

This is exactly the reason for my suggestion. One SSD would be for the OS and a few programs that are used constantly (adobe flash, java, web browser, etc). One SSD would be used primarily for gaming related software and games. And finally, the HDD would be used for storage of movies, music, documents, etc. that aren't accessed very often. You shouldn't store information on an SSD that you don't access very often. HDDs are still better for this, imo. Also, another reason for the separate SSDs is for fail-safe reasons. If the OS drives takes a dump, you'll still have your other drive intact. Which brings me to my next reason for the HDD. I would also "ghost" the OS SSD to a partition on the HDD. This would be a complete mirrored backup of the OS SSD. If the OS SSD takes a dump, you can restore the backup to a new SSD and be back up and running as if you never lost the drive at all.

 

My schooling is in the IT field so I'm very oriented towards thinking as a system admin (having fail-safes and redundancies in place with a plan to recover from failures) when it comes to my computer and hardware.

 

As for you're system, those specs look top notch. Wish I had the money you're planning on spending! :cool: If you're planning on overclocking your CPU I'd look into something like the CORSAIR Hydro Series H100i. There really isn't any point in overclocking most systems, imo. I've yet to overclock my i5 (Haswell) and have yet to see any need to.



#318 bootrocket

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 07:34 AM

Yes, back-up drives!  I forgot!  I had been planning to run a separate hard drive, and I may still, but a backup onto the HDD makes sense.  I've been working with a Puget rep, not to mention a few generous posters on the Nexus Forums.  The latter are quite busy, and a bit taciturn over the short term -- very helpful nevertheless.  I'll look into the idea that HDDs are better for long term, infrequently accessed files.

 

I have done a little research on my own of course.  Quiet is my emphasis.  Overclocking won't be an issue right away.  I had thought I might leave room for that option by choosing another cabinet but I'm leaning toward the very quiet -- a Puget Serenity Pro.  The model (custom) avoids HDDs entirely, and has a marginally smaller cabinet with no room for liquid cooling.  They don't include any HDDs among their main drive options at all.  I'll have to review this.

 

I appreciate the tips TechAngel.  Cheers!


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#319 bootrocket

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 10:40 AM

Quick addition to the above.  I logged in to Puget from another terminal and the website offered me choices that I had not seen since I logged in for the first time.  Got HDDs back on the menu and I'm reconsidering my drive profile.  Don't know what's going on there, but I'm sure its nothing more complicated than just resetting my selections.   - br


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#320 werewulfking

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 02:26 PM

Quick addition to the above.  I logged in to Puget from another terminal and the website offered me choices that I had not seen since I logged in for the first time.  Got HDDs back on the menu and I'm reconsidering my drive profile.  Don't know what's going on there, but I'm sure its nothing more complicated than just resetting my selections.   - br

May I ask why you are letting it be built? I don't know about this company but normally the are quite a bit more expensive and it is very easy to buiild a PC yourself. I was a bit wary when I built my first one a year  ago but I shouldn't have been.

 

And the Puget case looks like the Fractal Design Define R5 or R4 so you can easily get it for yourself. I have it and it is really quiet. Also if you want a quiet PC Water-Cooling like Tech Angel suggested can sometimes be an issue for some people as the pumps can be a bit loud.

 

And honestly the Power Supply is so overkill for a single or sometimes even double GPU PC. Nvidia should be fine for SLI with 650W but amd 290x for example not.


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#321 bootrocket

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Posted 03 February 2015 - 06:39 PM

Good questions werewulfking.  I'm having someone else build it, or at least I think I am, because this build for me represents my foot in the door, on the the ground floor going up.  I'm a noob.  I know of a few on-line build tutorials, but each has a different approach, and the range of opinions on this subject are significant.  Not to mention that there is quite some difference between watching it be done, and doing it one self.  

 

I figure I'll add or replace a few DDR3, fans, graphics cards, or even a CPU before taking a shot at a mother board or the whole enchilada.  I suppose that if I had the benefit of knowing an experienced friend who lives near by I might be more confident, but I would hate to screw something up.  I just don't have the time for the three steps forward two steps backward thing.  It's tempting, but I have a few rather pressing responsibilities outside of the PC modding arena.  

 

Right now I just want to make sure that I know what's out there, where I stand, what I'm getting, and that my Puget sales rep has my best interests in mind.  I found Puget by the way through Silent PC Review.  They seemed to be among the best builds out there that weren't prohibitively expensive.  And to be honest, we haven't really discussed the power supply yet.  It's a process.  I've made note of your suggestion nevertheless.  Thanks for that.  


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#322 HitTheLow

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 11:43 AM

Hi,

 

I've read the Hardware Guide etc. and want to begin starting S.T.E.P but I am still unsure which 'path' to follow, here are my specs;

 

CPU: i3 2120 @ 3.3ghz

GPU: R9 280 3GB VRAM

RAM: 8GB 

 

My issue is my CPU probably places me at the baseline or 'core' setup for S.T.E.P, but my GPU and RAM are beyond this.

 

Which 'path' should I follow in this regard?

 

Thanks.


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#323 TechAngel85

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 11:47 AM

You can still install STEP, but stick to the baseline suggestions for each mod. An i3 will run a STEP modded Skyrim; however, be sure to not be running anything in the background that would take from the CPU.



#324 HitTheLow

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 12:49 PM

You can still install STEP, but stick to the baseline suggestions for each mod. An i3 will run a STEP modded Skyrim; however, be sure to not be running anything in the background that would take from the CPU.

 

So even with that GPU and RAM - I still have to run STEP Core on baseline? That's a shame, I might consider getting an i5 then -  I just upgraded my 6870 to a R9 280 recently for Skyrim.

 

Thanks.


Edited by HitTheLow, 06 February 2015 - 12:49 PM.

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#325 TechAngel85

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 12:55 PM

What I meant us that you can install the entirety of the Guide. Just still to the baseline recommendations. Most of the mods are simple texture replacers. The Gameplay section will have a lot of scripts which will depend on CPU. Skyrim it's can run on a dual-core processor. A modded Skyrim isn't much more CPU intensive than the base game. It all mainly depends on your GPU when modding.



#326 HitTheLow

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 01:29 PM

What I meant us that you can install the entirety of the Guide. Just still to the baseline recommendations. Most of the mods are simple texture replacers. The Gameplay section will have a lot of scripts which will depend on CPU. Skyrim it's can run on a dual-core processor. A modded Skyrim isn't much more CPU intensive than the base game. It all mainly depends on your GPU when modding.

 

Ok - so I would install the 'core' path, and not the 'extended' then? As my GPU and RAM is good enough to do the 'extended' path, but my CPU is only good enough for baseline 'core'.


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#327 TechAngel85

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 01:55 PM

Install the Extended path, is what I'm saying. Follow the recommendations for those mods.



#328 HitTheLow

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Posted 07 February 2015 - 06:54 AM

Install the Extended path, is what I'm saying. Follow the recommendations for those mods.

Ok thanks - also I am aware STEP doesn't directly recommend a specific ENB - but do you have any suggestions for an ENB to install on top of STEP for great visuals that don't knee-cap performance for my specs?


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#329 bootrocket

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 11:40 AM


So even with that GPU and RAM - I still have to run STEP Core on baseline? That's a shame, I might consider getting an i5 then -  I just upgraded my 6870 to a R9 280 recently for Skyrim.

 

Thanks.

What I meant us that you can install the entirety of the Guide. Just still to the baseline recommendations. Most of the mods are simple texture replacers. The Gameplay section will have a lot of scripts which will depend on CPU. Skyrim it's can run on a dual-core processor. A modded Skyrim isn't much more CPU intensive than the base game. It all mainly depends on your GPU when modding.

Hey Tech, after following this guide for a while I've noticed that more than a few prospective hardware modders are confused over what is meant by "core."  Perhaps an update in nomenclature is in order.  Part of the confusion may be the absence of a comprehensive definition of the term.  The other being that the the term "core" refers to the type of mod exclusively, and not the hardware that complements it.  

 

The manner in which the Hardware Guide is set up under "What to Buy," after the Introduction / Purpose of the guide, gives one the impression that the terms Core, Extended and Beyond refer to the type of hardware.  I believe the author means to say something like, To download, and run STEP:Core, etc.  

 

I understand that part of the problem may be that to create bright line recommendations for hardware at each level of software modding is problematic, given that Skyrim only requires a core two processor, the market provides too many options for one hardware profile, and running the mods themselves require "balance" as you say.  Falcon's "Logical Increments" guide is case and point. (We need a new link to the updated website, by the way.) There are a great many variables.  I dunno.  Just a suggestion.  :blush:


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#330 TechAngel85

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 12:26 PM

It could possibly be clearer in the meaning. Core refers to the recommended hardware to run STEP:Core. Extended refers to the recommended hardware to run STEP:Extended. Beyond STEP refers to running mods beyond the scope of STEP such as ENB, SFO 2.x, etc.



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