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#331 bootrocket

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 06:00 PM

It could possibly be clearer in the meaning. Core refers to the recommended hardware to run STEP:Core. Extended refers to the recommended hardware to run STEP:Extended. Beyond STEP refers to running mods beyond the scope of STEP such as ENB, SFO 2.x, etc.

Interesting, we have a little ambiguity going on here, imho.  I had it exactly the opposite.  One might read "core" or "extended" both ways -- hardware or software -- especially when one is using a noun like "Core" as a modifier for the noun "mod."  For example, "Only core mods Installed," may be read as either only baseline mods installed, or only mods installed that will run with baseline hardware.  Sorry, I'm a little off topic here.  


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#332 edynacio

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 08:13 AM

What are you using as surge protection? And why.

 

It seems that surge protection is not a common discussed topic when it comes to the "hardware" choices in the gaming community.

I'm curious what everyone is using to protect their expensive components.

 

I'm building a new system and need some advice.

Thanks


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#333 TechAngel85

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 08:43 AM

I simply have mine connected to a mid-grade protector that has a decent warranty on it for your electronics.

#334 edynacio

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 01:04 PM

Thanks Tech.

 

I was a little lost reasearching for diferent types of surge protectors.

I was reading about joules and other specs but I guess in the end all it matters is the warranty because in case of a massive surge there's no guarantee that the system will be protected.

 

I'll just have to read the warranty carefully.


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#335 Greg

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 05:35 PM

Generally a good quality "home/office" power strip with built-in surge protection should work fine. You'll also want to protect incoming DSL/cable connections as well. These will generally suppress normal surges that you wouldn't otherwise notice, although a good surge can kill the protective circuits and these don't come with "consumer replaceable parts" (meaning you generally can't take them apart to fix them) so you have to buy a new $30 unit instead of replacing a 5c fuse or a 50c MOV.

 

You're right that a good surge protector will protect your equipment from common surges but it doesn't have a chance against a direct lightning strike. If you're in an area prone to lightning strikes, you'll get better (but still not guaranteed) protection from lightning rods. Of course, a lightning rod doesn't do much good if lightning strikes a pole across the street. The best protection in a lightning storm is to unplug it.. power, telephone, DSL/cable/fiber, the works. Of course, there's still no guarantee it won't get hit.



#336 GSDFan

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 05:03 AM

You should invest in a good quality UPS, battery backup, as it will protect from brownouts and provide a clean voltage to your computer power supply and any other electronics connected to it. It should be of the kind that has a transformer in it and not a switching power type.



#337 TechAngel85

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 08:44 AM

You should invest in a good quality UPS, battery backup, as it will protect from brownouts and provide a clean voltage to your computer power supply and any other electronics connected to it. It should be of the kind that has a transformer in it and not a switching power type.

I always found this to be major overkill for home users and even for gamers. These things cost a good amount of money and still have to be replaced every so many years because the batteries go bad. UPSs are meant for businesses and servers that house sensitive functions and data so that they can shut down properly without losing that data. The risk of data loss and/or damage due to a sudden shutdown is actually a lot more minimal than most people think. Going through college and getting certified in IT, UPSs are not ever mentioned being reasonable options for home users. I always laughed when I went to a client's home and seen one of these things because I knew they got duped into buying one from the local PC salesman trying to make more profit.

 

UPSs are overkill for home users, that just my opinion. Now if you have a home business or are constantly doing editing-type work, then the investment isn't so bad since losing this type of work would mean hours of productivity loss...then again, those users should be in the habit of saving more often than most users.



#338 Greg

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 06:22 PM

I generally agree with TechAngel that a UPS is overkill for the majority of home computer users. All most home users really need is a good surge protector.

 

A UPS can keep the PC running during brownouts and short-term blackouts, but I don't generally recommend a UPS unless you are working on "critical stuff" as or your area suffers frequent brownouts and blackouts. TechAngel also makes a very good point that UPSs must be replaced every few years because the batteries don't last forever and cost almost as much as a new UPS. Of course, UPS manufacturers don't use off-the-shelf gel-cell batteries because they don't want you to buy a $30 replacement battery. They want you to buy the $90+ plus shipping and handling replacement battery from them -- assuming it's still stocked and available.

 

Also keep in mind that UPSes are generally divided into these broad categories:

  • Relative cheap (*cough*APC/TrippLite*cough*) UPSes output a square wave that are not compatible with all home electronics and some PC power supplies, and may burn out wall-warts and analog gear
  • Moderately priced UPSes that output a stepped sine wave that should theoretically work most home home electronics and PCs, but may also pose compatibility issues with some PC power supplies and analog devices
  • Moderately priced UPSes that output a simulated sine wave that mimics a true sine wave that should theoretically work for everything
  • Expensive UPSes that output a true sine wave required for medical devices and such

I personally use a CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD on my desktop and two CyberPower CP1000PFCLCD for two servers, a wireless router, and a cable modem. These don't output perfect sine waves, but it's relatively close enough.



#339 dx1

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 07:17 PM

Instead of an UPS I would recommend a high-quality PSU that can manage some surges and spikes, maybe a multiple socket outlet with overvoltage protection, and an insurance (not warranty or such) that covers the whole building burnt down, with all your stuff and the neighbour's stuff inside (and maybe a neighbour or eight), and that also covers the costs arisen from the fire run (dict.cc at work here). But that's just my opinion based on living in Germany.

 

Since I live in my own place (more than twelve years now) there was no non-scheduled blackout and even with an ►electrical substation (which looks like ►this in my corner of the world) within 30 meter of my apartment I'm waiting for a thunderstorm crashing my PC. Circuit breakers did their job when my cheap electric kettle died, and my wife's PC became unstable when two capacitors were dried out, but that was it.

 

Several trips to South-Brazil and talking to tech-savvy people there told me modern electronic consumer hardware is even more robust than I thought—and I never used anything for electrical grounding since I installed my very first Sound Blaster-compatible back in 1993. 110 or 230 Volts, 50 or 60 Hz? Doesn't matter. Your gear plugged in when the power comes back? No problem, anymore. Back in the 70's my uncle tinkered something with contactors that kept your stuff disconnected from the grid after a blackout until you hit a switch, to prevent it from damage due to the spikes … But that was over 40 years ago and in times of centrally planned economy.


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#340 edynacio

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 09:25 PM

Thanks everyone for the input and clarification.

I haven't had a power outage were I live in 3 years and I won't be using my personal PC to work on "critical stuff" (I have a work laptop for that), so the UPS wouldn't be the way to go.

I bought a Corsair RM750 https://www.corsair....ed-power-supply

I've been searching Amazon for some decent surge protectors.
Any suggestions in terms of reliable brands (I was under the impression that APC/TrippLite were good brands) and specific models that you might know off?
I won't be needing more then 4 outlets

Edited by edynacio, 26 August 2015 - 09:28 PM.

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#341 dx1

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 06:00 PM

Corsair? Good choice. I have the HX 750 since 2009—the warranty  is about to expire in Nov 2016—and bought the VX 550 for my wife's PC a half year later. Everyone loved BeQuiet back then but I had three of that brand dead before their third birthday.

 

For the outlets APC is good and their products are not to expensive. I don't have any of those, so I can't recommend a specific product.

 

And just in case someone tells you Brennenstuhl was good: It's not. It's overpriced and the quality is mediocre at best.


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#342 edynacio

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 02:48 PM

This is what I end up getting in case somebody is interested.

 

https://www.amazon.c...ailpage_o00_s00


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#343 Getsune

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 05:39 PM

Hello everyone,

 

I recently decided to once more travel Skyrim and it's beautiful environment. I've been setting up STEP in the past and was stunned how different the game looked and felt afterwards, so I want to give it a shot again. However, before I even start setting something up, I wanted to ask if my hardware still suffices for a STEP:Extended setup with stable 30-60 FPS.

 

My specs:

  • OS // Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1
  • CPU // AMD FX-6300 Six-Core 3,5 GHz
  • RAM // 16,0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 803MHz
  • Motherboard // ASUSTeK Computer INC. M5A78L-M/USB3 (AM3R2)
  • Graphics Card // 2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti (MSI)
  • Storage // 232GB Samsung SSD 840 EVO 250GB ATA Device (SSD) // 1863GB Seagate ST2000DM001-1ER164 ATA Device (SATA)

I know that it's pretty much a mid-end computer by now and that you could practically upgrade every component of it. I do have some money at hand currently, so replacing a component or two isn't a problem but I'd like to keep it below 700€/500£. Any ideas and/or experiences what should be upgraded first?

 

I was unsure about whether the Hardware Guide is still up-to-date or not, so I decided to ask directly. Thanks in advance! 


Edited by Getsune, 10 December 2015 - 05:41 PM.

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#344 TechAngel85

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 05:47 PM

The only thing that would hold you back a little is your graphics card, but it is still within the baselines for running STEP. Just follow the baseline recommendations and you will be fine.



#345 Getsune

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 03:08 AM

The only thing that would hold you back a little is your graphics card, but it is still within the baselines for running STEP. Just follow the baseline recommendations and you will be fine.

Oh, really? I thought that I should at least upgrade the CPU as it was mentioned in the guide that Intel CPUs perform much better than AMD ones right now.


Edited by Getsune, 11 December 2015 - 06:40 AM.

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